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1.1.5 Family and Friends Carers Policy

RELEVANT CHAPTER

Children Cared for by Family and Friends Procedure

AMENDMENT

This chapter was updated in September 2014 to reflect the introduction of the ‘Child Arrangement Order’ introduced by the Children and Families Act 2014 which amended section 8 of the Children Act 1989 and replaced the ‘Residence Order’.


Contents

1. Introduction
2. Policy
  2.1 Values, Principles and Objectives
  2.2 Evidence Base
  2.3 Management
  2.4 Legal Framework
3. Different Situations Whereby Children May be Living with Family and Friends Carers 
  3.1 Informal Family and Friends Care Arrangements
  3.2 Private Fostering Arrangements
  3.3 Family and Friends Foster Carers “Connected Persons” 
  3.4 Child Arrangements Orders
  3.5 Special Guardianship Order
  3.6 Adoption Order
4. Financial Support
  4.1 Financial Support for Children in Need
  4.2 Family and Friend Foster Carers
  4.3 Financial Support for Special Guardians and Child Arrangements Orders
5. Accommodation   
6. Supporting Contact with Parents
7. Family Group Conferences
8. Support Groups
9. Complaints
  Annex A: Caring for Somebody Else's Child - Options


1. Introduction

The Statutory Guidance for Local Authorities, Family and Friends Care, published in 2011 makes it a requirement for every Local Authority with children’s services to publish in collaboration with Local Partners a Policy setting out its approach towards promoting and supporting the needs of children living with Family and Friends Carers, whether or not they are looked after children.

Family and Friends Carers play a unique role in enabling children and young people to remain with the people they know and trust if they are unable to live with their parents. A family and friends carer is someone who is a family member or friend of a child and whom the child has been living with full time. This could be in any of the following circumstances:

  • In informal arrangements with a relative such as Grandparent, Brother, Sister, Aunt or Uncle (whether of full blood or half blood, by marriage or civil partnership or step parent);
  • In informal arrangements with friends or other family members which lasts for a period of less than 28 days;
  • As a Private Fostering Arrangement;
  • As a Looked After Child placed with Foster Carers;
  • Under a Child Arrangements Order or a Special Guardianship Order;
  • In arrangements which may lead to an Adoption Order.

Family and Friends Carers often take one or more children into their care at short notice during a time of family crisis without having the time to prepare or to consider the impact that this arrangement may have on their own lives or that of their family. This can be very challenging for the carers and normal family relationships may be strained. The most common reasons for children being cared for by family and friends are those which are related to parental factors such as domestic violence, alcohol or substance misuse, mental or physical illness, incapacity, separation or divorce, imprisonment or death of a child. Child related factors such as disability or challenging behaviour may also be reasons.

Many Family and Friends Carers are the child’s Grandparents who may be older or in poorer health. The impact of caring for a child can have a significant impact on the carer’s lifestyle as a result of practical problems such as accommodation or financial support. Some Grandparents may be less well off financially either because they are in receipt of a pension and unable to increase their income to take account of additional expenditure or because they have to give up work in order to take on the care of the child. Single carers may face particular practical problems or emotional difficulties in caring for a child and may need support to help them to succeed. Sometimes an older sibling becomes the carer needing support to deal with their own feelings and problems in addition to those providing full time care for a younger Brother or Sister. An older sibling may have experienced similar difficulties to those of the child for whom they become the carer, whilst their new role may seriously disrupt their education, employment or social life at a stage when they had not planned to have caring responsibilities. Uncles and Aunts may have their own children of a similar age to those for whom they have become carers, which may place considerable pressures on the whole household. Each case will bring different challenges to Family and Friends Carers.


2. Policy

This Policy promotes permanence for children and young people by seeking to enable those who cannot live with their parents to remain with members of their extended family or friends. For most looked after children, permanence is achieved through a successful return to their birth family, where this is not possible family and friends care can provide an alternative route to permanence for the child. The Policy also focuses on narrowing the gap in outcomes between children from disadvantaged backgrounds and their peers and sets out Wirral Council’s approach in collaboration with its Local Partners towards promoting and supporting the needs of children living with Family and Friends Carers.

Wirral Council believes that children and families should receive good quality services which meet their needs and by working effectively together with Local Partners and Specialist Services it will ensure there is a comprehensive approach to early intervention. This will allow family and friends to provide the appropriate care for children and young people who cannot live with their parents and have access to a range of high quality support services at universal, targeted and specialist levels.

We will strive to ensure that services are based on the needs of the child and are not allocated solely on the basis of a child’s legal status and that services will not be withheld merely because the child is living with a carer under an informal arrangement rather than in a placement with a Foster Carer or with a person with a Child Arrangements Order, Special Guardianship Order or an Adoption Order.

In drawing up this Policy we have consulted with children, young people, Family and Friends Carers and other Agencies. This Policy should help Family and Friends Carers to understand the type of arrangements that exist, the types of services available and where to go for further information. It will be regularly reviewed and be made freely and widely available.

2.1 Values, Principles and Objectives 

Consideration of children's welfare and best interests will always be at the centre of the work we do. It is an underlying principle that it should be made possible for children to live within their families unless this is not consistent with their welfare. Where a child cannot live within his or her immediate family and the Local Authority is considering the need to look after the child, we will make every effort to identify potential carers within the child’s network of family or friends who are able and willing to care for the child. We will provide support for any such arrangements based on the assessed needs of the child, not simply on his or her legal status, and will seek to ensure that Family and Friends Carers are provided with support to ensure that children do not become looked after by the Local Authority, or do not have to remain looked after longer than is needed.

We aim to improve the outcomes for children who cannot live with their parents and in order to achieve this Wirral Council will:

  • Promote permanence for children by allowing them to remain with their extended family or friends, in conditions that provide for their emotional and physical needs and is legally secure;
  • Provide a clear Policy framework for family and friends care which is supported by good demographic and needs data;
  • Work in collaboration with Local Partners to promote and support the needs of children being cared for by family or friends;
  • Continue to consult with and listen to the views of children, young people, Family and Friends Carers and parents;
  • Provide regularly updated information that is made freely and widely available and published by the relevant means.

The following values and principles underpin the Family and Friends Care Policy:

  • Children should be able to live with their families unless this is not consistent with their welfare;
  • Support will be based on the needs of the child and not their legal status to ensure that Family and Friends Carers are provided with the support they require to ensure that children do not become or remain Looked After for longer than is needed;
  • Children (if they have sufficient understanding), parents, carers and other relevant interested parties should be given the opportunity to participate actively in the decision making process;
  • The child, parents, carers and other relevant interested parties will be consulted before any decision is made which will affect the child;
  • Contact between children and young people and those important to them, including immediate and extended family, friends and community links will be actively promoted as long as it is in the best interests of the child;
  • Wirral Council and its Partner Agencies will ensure accountability is sustained and will make children, parents and carers aware of the powers and duties of the Local Authority and explain any action that may be taken.

2.2 Evidence Based

In Order to draw up the Family and Friends Care Policy, key messages from research were identified and consultation was carried out with children and young people, Family and Friends Carers, parents and Partner Agencies through focus groups and the completion of questionnaires.

Wirral Council will continue to meet and consult with children and Family and Friend’s Carers to ensure that we listen to their views and work with them to collate evidence of what works in supporting Family and Friends Carers to meet children’s needs. This will also allow additional support for carers to be identified. The evidence collated will underpin a Family and Friends Care action plan which Wirral Council and Partner Agencies will work towards to improve communication, services and support for Family and Friends Carers and the children they care for.

2.3 Management

The Senior Manager for Children in Care and Specialist Services has the overall responsibility for the Family and Friends Care Policy and will ensure that:

  • The Policy will continue to meet the statutory requirements of Wirral Council;
  • The Policy will be responsive to the needs of children and carers by regularly reviewing the Policy and providing ongoing forums for consultation to allow for the provision of informed and up to date information;
  • The Policy will be understood by all Local Authority staff and that they operate within its framework so that it is applied in a consistent and fair manner across Wirral Council;
  • Local Partners are aware of their responsibilities towards children living in family and friends care and are proactive in meeting those needs;
  • The Policy is publicised sufficiently to ensure that anyone who may be considering becoming a Family and Friends Carer are aware how to contact Wirral Council and other Agencies for further information about relevant services;
  • Staff receive the appropriate training to help them understand their obligations, powers and responsibilities and are aware of the issues which Family and Friends Carers may face.

2.4 Legal Framework

All Local Authorities have a general duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of ‘Children In Need’ living within their area and to promote the upbringing of such children by their families. A Child in Need is defined in Section 17(10) of the Children Act 1989, as a child who is disabled or who is unlikely to achieve or maintain a reasonable standard of health or development without the provision of services by the Local Authority. The way in which Wirral Council fulfils this duty is by providing a range and level of services appropriate to those children’s assessed needs, which can include financial, practical or other support.

It is important to note that Local Authorities do not have a general duty to assess all arrangements where children are living with their wider family or friends network rather than their parents but it does have a duty where it appears that services may be necessary to safeguard or promote the welfare of a Child in Need.


3. Different Situations Whereby Children May be Living with Family and Friends Carers 

Children in Need may live with members of their family or friends in a variety of different legal arrangements, some formal and some informal. Different Court Orders are available to formalise these arrangements.

Looked after children will always come within the definition of Children in Need, whether they are accommodated under Section 20 of the Children Act 1989 (with parental consent) or in care subject to a Court Order whereby the Local Authority shares Parental Responsibility for the child. The Local Authority has a responsibility wherever possible to make arrangements for a looked after child to live with a member of the family (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989).

3.1 Informal Family and Friends Care Arrangements

Where a child cannot be cared for within his or her immediate family, the family may make their own arrangements to care for the child within the family and friends network. The Local Authority does not have a duty to assess any such informal family and friends care arrangements, unless it appears to the Authority that services may be necessary to safeguard or promote the welfare of a Child in Need. In such cases, the Local Authority has a responsibility under Section 17 of the Children Act 1989 to assess the child’s needs and provide services to meet any assessed needs of the child. Following assessment, a Child In Need Plan will be drawn up and a package of support will be identified. This can comprise a variety of different types of services and support, including financial support.

3.2 Private Fostering Arrangements

A Privately Fostered child is a child under 16 (or 18 if disabled) who is cared for by an adult who is not a parent or close relative, where the child is to be cared for in that home for 28 days or more. A close relative is defined as ‘a Grandparent, Brother, Sister, Uncle or Aunt (whether of the full blood or half blood or by marriage or civil partnership) or step-parent.’ It does not include a child who is looked after by a Local Authority. In a Private Fostering Arrangement, the parent still holds Parental Responsibility and agrees the arrangement with the Private Foster Carer.

The Local Authority has a duty to assess and monitor the welfare of all Privately Fostered children and the way in which they carry out these duties is set out in the Children (Private Arrangements for Fostering) Regulations 2005. However, the Local Authority may also become involved with a child in a Private Fostering Arrangement where the child comes within the definition of a Child in Need. In such cases, the Local Authority has a responsibility to provide services to meet the assessed needs of the child under Section 17 of the Children Act 1989. Following assessment, a Child In Need Plan will be drawn up and a package of support will be identified. This can comprise a variety of different types of services and support, including financial support. For more Information see Private Fostering Procedure.

3.3 Family and Friends Foster Carers “Connected Persons”

Where a child is looked after by the Local Authority, there is a responsibility wherever possible to make arrangements for the child to live with a member of the family who is approved as a Foster Carer (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989). The child can be placed with the family members prior to such approval, subject to an assessment and temporary approval of the placement, for up to 16 weeks. This temporary approval can only be extended in exceptional circumstances. In this context the carer is referred to as a Connected Person. Where temporary approval is given to such a placement the carers will receive financial support on a regular basis.

In addition the child will have a Placement Plan which sets out the specific arrangements surrounding the child and the carers including the expectations of the foster carers and the support they can expect to receive to enable them to fulfil their responsibilities for the child.

The assessment and approval process for family and friends who apply to be Foster Carers for a specific Looked After child will be the same as for any other Foster Carer except that the timescales for the assessment are different where a child is already in the placement as indicated above. In all other respects the process is the same as for any other potential Foster Carers. An information pack will be available to potential Foster Carers about the process and they will be given the name and contact details of the Social Worker from the Wirral Fostering Service allocated to carry out the assessment. See Fostering Statement of Purpose - to follow relating to connected persons who are approved as Foster Carers.

Once approved as Foster Carers, they will be allocated a Supervising Social Worker from the Fostering Service to provide them with support and supervision; and they will receive Fostering Allowances for as long as they care for the child as a Foster Carer. In addition to the Fostering Allowance Family and Friends Foster Carers will be eligible to be considered to receive a Band Skills Fee in the same way as all other foster carers once they have completed the approved Foster Carer training and been approved at Fostering Panel. The Band Skills Fee is a reward payment to carers in recognition of their skills in caring for children and young people.

The Foster Carer will also be expected to cooperate with the processes that are in place to ensure that the child receives appropriate care and support, for example, contributing to reviews of the child’s Care Plan, liasing with the child’s Social Worker and promoting the child’s education and health needs. (See also Children Cared for by Family and Friends Procedure.)

3.4 Child Arrangements Orders

These orders replace the previous Contact Orders (in Private Law) and Residence Orders.

A Child Arrangements Order is a Court Order which details who a child should live, spend time or otherwise have contact with and which gives Parental Responsibility to the person in whose favour it is made, usually lasting until the child is 18. Parental Responsibility is shared with the parents. Relatives may apply for a Child Arrangements Order after caring for the child for one year. Child Arrangements Orders may be made in Private Family Proceedings in which the Local Authority is not a party nor involved in any way in the arrangements. However, a Child Arrangements Order in favour of a relative or Foster Carer (who was a ‘Connected Person’) with whom a child is placed may be an appropriate outcome as part of a Permanence Plan for a Child in Need or a Looked After child.

The Local Authority may provide financial support to relatives or friends with a Child Arrangements Order, unless they are a spouse or civil partner of a parent, with whom a child is living under a Child Arrangements Order. This is set out in paragraph 15 of Schedule 1 of the Children Act 1989. However such financial support is discretionary.

3.5 Special Guardianship Order

Special Guardianship offers a further option for children needing permanent care outside their birth family. It can offer greater security without absolute severance from the birth family as in Adoption. Relatives may apply for a Special Guardianship Order after caring for the child for one year. As Special Guardians, they will have Parental Responsibility for the child which can be exercised with greater autonomy on day-to-day matters than where there is a Child Arrangements Order, whilst the birth parents retain limited parental rights.

Special Guardianship Orders may be made in Private Family Proceedings and the Local Authority will be required to provide a report to Court on their assessment of the suitability of the carers to be Special Guardians for the child. A Special Guardianship Order in favour of a relative or Foster Carer (who was a ‘Connected Person’) with whom a child is living may be an appropriate outcome as part of a Permanence Plan for a Child in Need or a ‘Looked After’ child. Where the child was Looked After immediately prior to the making of the Special Guardianship Order, the Local Authority has a responsibility to assess the support needs of the child, parents and Special Guardians, including the need for financial support. However children who were not previously looked after must not be disadvantaged and they will also usually be assessed for Special Guardianship Support Services.

Special Guardianship Orders usually last until the child is 18, but unlike Adoption, the Order can be varied or discharged. (See also Court Reports for Adoption/Special Guardianship Guidance and Financial Support for Special Guardianship and Child Arrangements Orders Procedure).

3.6 Adoption Order

Adoption is the process by which all parental rights and responsibilities for a child are permanently transferred to an Adoptive Parent by a Court. As a result the child legally becomes part of the Adoptive Family.

An Adoption Order in favour of a relative or Foster Carer (who was a ‘Connected Person’) with whom a child is living may be an appropriate outcome as part of a Permanence Plan for a Child in Need or a ‘Looked After’ child.

Local Authorities must make arrangements, as part of their Adoption service, for the provision of a range of Adoption Support Services. They then have to undertake assessments of the need for Adoption Support Services at the request of the Adopted Child, Adoptive Parents and their families, as well as birth relatives. The support required is then set out in an Adoption Support Plan and this may include financial support.


4. Financial Support

When children are living with another family, other than their birth family, they will become eligible to claim new state benefits such as Child Benefit and Child Tax Credits unless the carers are Foster Carers for the children. Therefore wherever possible, families are expected to be financially independent from Council support in the long term.

It is important that carers are signposted and supported in claiming their entitlement to any state benefits such as Child Benefit, Child Tax Credit, Disability Living Allowance, and any other discretionary financial support. Assistance can be given through the Welfare Rights Service or through making carers aware of other advice services such as Advocacy in Wirral and Citizen’s Advice Bureau.

However, Wirral Council understands that when family and friends take on the care of another person’s child or children this may create significant initial financial difficulties for the carers, especially when this was not planned. Birth parents retain their responsibilities for the maintenance of their children when living with another family member or when it is a Private Fostering Arrangement, Wirral Council encourage parents to support carers in their role.

Therefore when there has been an assessed need identified and a Child In Need Plan is in place, Wirral Council will consider providing financial support under the Local Authority powers to make payments for children in need under section 17(6) of the Children Act 1989. Consideration will also be given to applying for charitable funds to support the family.

4.1 Financial Support for Children in Need

There are four categories of payment, which may be considered. One or more of these may be applicable, depending on the particular circumstances of the case:

  1. Subsistence crisis (one-off) payments. These should be used to overcome a crisis, following the best assessment that can be achieved in the circumstances and where funds cannot be provided through a crisis loan from the Social Fund;
  2. Setting-up. These are for items such as clothing, furniture, or bedding where the family cannot get support from benefits. The Social Worker must be satisfied that the carers’ financial position justifies the payment through a financial assessment. Where possible items should be purchased through the Councils procurement process. Assistance may be given subject to conditions, including repayment in certain situations. However, in most situations, it will be inappropriate for the Department to seek to recover money provided under these circumstances;
  3. Weekly living contribution. It is possible for the Local Authority to make regular payments to assist family members or friends care for a child. Such payments should not be a substitute for claiming other benefits such as Child Benefit and Child Tax Credits. However time limited regular payments whilst other benefits are secured;
  4. Other support needs. The Local Authority may also provide, in exceptional circumstances financial support for other child related support costs such as Nursery/Child minder costs, contact arrangements, travel costs. Preferably this should be paid directly to the provider or in exceptional circumstances can be paid in cash to the carers.

In all cases where regular financial support is agreed, a written agreement will be drawn up detailing the level and duration of the financial support that is to be provided, and the mechanism for review.

The following criteria will be applied to all such payments:

  • The purpose of the payments must be to safeguard and promote the welfare of the child;
  • As part of the assessment, a view should be taken as to whether the carers need financial support based on their reasonable requirements in taking on the care of the child;
  • There are no other legitimate sources of finance;
  • Payments will be paid to the carer, not the parents.

Any Financial Support must be agreed by a Senior Manager.

4.2 Family and Friend Foster Carers

Where the children are in the care of the Local Authority and the Family and Friends Carers are approved as Foster Carers under Regulation 24 Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) the carers will receive a clothing allowance of £200 per child and the ongoing Basic Fostering Allowance immediately (see Foster Carer Payment Guidance). In addition to the Fostering Allowance, Family and Friends Foster Carers will be eligible from 1st April 2012 to be considered to receive a Band Skills Fee in the same way as all other foster carers once they have completed the approved Foster Carer training and been approved by the Fostering Panel as Foster Carers. The Band Skills Fee is a reward payment to carers in recognition of their skills in caring for children and young people. (See also Children Cared for by Family and Friends Procedure.)

4.3 Financial Support for Special Guardians and Child Arrangements Orders  

When children are staying with family and friends on a permanent basis and applications are being made to become Special Guardians or for a Child Arrangements Order consideration will be given to financial support according to Financial Support for Special Guardianship and Child Arrangements Orders Procedure.

Financial support for Prospective Special Guardians and those applying for a Child Arrangements Order will only be payable where there has been an assessment that one of the following circumstances exist:

  • Where it is necessary to ensure that the carer can look after the child;
  • Where the child needs special care which requires greater expenditure of resources by reason of illness, disability, emotional or behavioural difficulties, or the continuing consequences of past abuse or neglect;
  • Where the Local Authority considers it appropriate to contribute to legal costs, including Court fees of a Special Guardian or Prospective Special Guardianship for the making of a Special Guardianship Order or the discharge of such an Order; or an applications for an Order under Section 8 of the Children Act 1989; or an Order for financial provision to be made to or for the benefit of the child;
  • Where the Local Authority considers it appropriate to contribute toward to the expenditure necessary for the purposes of accommodating and maintaining the child, including the provision of furniture and domestic equipment, alterations to and adaptations of the home, provision of means of transport, and provision of clothing, toys and other items necessary for the purpose of looking after the child.

Financial support can be paid as:

  • Periodical payments to meet the need which is likely to give rise to recurring expenditure; or
  • A single payment; or
  • Payment by instalments.

Where it has been determined that financial support is to be considered a full financial assessment of the person’s circumstances will be undertaken and presented to a Permanency Panel for consideration. The amount of any financial support will be based on the assessed needs of the child and the financial position of the carers to support the child. The Permanency Panel will make a recommendation to the Head of Specialist Services for a decision. Carers will have 28 days to appeal against any decision for financial support. Any periodic payments will be subject to an annual review.

Where Special Guardian or person with a Child Arrangements Order was receiving Fostering Allowance for the child, as an approved Foster Carer, immediately prior to the Order they will continue to receive the Skills Fee (element of remuneration) paid for that child prior to the Order for 2 years following the Order. The Skills Fee will cease after 2 years unless there are exceptional reasons for this to continue.

Periodic payments will cease if the child ceases to have a home with the carers, the child ceases full-time education or training and commences employment; the child qualifies for Income Support or Jobseeker’s Allowance in his/her own right; or the child attains the age of 18 unless he/she continues in full-time education or training, when it may continue until the end of the course or training he/she is then undertaking.


5. Accommodation

Family and Friends Carers may need support with accommodation, as their homes may not be of sufficient capacity to suddenly take on the care of a child or possibly a sibling group of children. The Council will continue to work in partnership to support the housing needs which Family and Friends Carers may encounter across the range of legal circumstances. We will also continue to work with landlords to ensure, whenever possible, Family and Friends Carers living in social housing are given appropriate priority to move to more suitable accommodation if this will prevent the need for a child to become looked after. Wirral Council have the power under 17 of the 1989 Children Act to give financial support towards accommodation costs where they assess this is the most appropriate way to safeguard and promote the welfare of a child. See Wirral Council Procedure Provision of suitable accommodation to meet the needs of children in care.


6. Supporting Contact with Parents

Wirral Council is under a duty to promote contact for all children in need although this differs depending on whether or not the child is looked after. Where the child is not looked after, we are required to promote contact between the child and his/ her family ‘where it is necessary to do so in Order to safeguard and promote his or her welfare’. As part of the support arrangements, it may be identified that specific assistance is required to ensure that any such contact can be managed safely. If necessary, information will be made available to Family and Friends Carers about local Contact Centres and Family Mediation Services and how to make use of their services.

Where a child is Looked After, we are required to endeavour to promote contact between the child and his or her family ‘unless it is not practicable or consistent with the child’s welfare’. The overall objective of the contact arrangements will be included in the child’s Care Plan and the specific arrangements will be set out in the child’s Placement Plan.

See Contact with Parents, Siblings, Relatives and Connected Persons Procedure for further information.


7. Family Group Conferences

Family Group Conferences are held between professionals and family members, which aim to achieve the best outcomes for children. They promote the involvement of the wider family to achieve a resolution of difficulties for Children in Need, and may help to identify short-term and/or permanent solutions for children within the family network. Wirral Council will offer a Family Group Conference or other form of family meeting at an early stage. If a child becomes looked after, perhaps following an emergency, without a Family Group Conference having been held, then (where appropriate) we will arrange one as soon as possible. For more information see Family Group Conference procedure. (See Family Group Conferences Procedure.)


8. Support Groups

Family and Friends Carers may sometimes feel isolated when they take on this role, particularly when they are dealing with the complex needs of vulnerable children for which they had not planned. Getting together with others in a similar position can often be an invaluable source of support in itself. Support Groups are a valuable way of helping carers to access information about services which will help them to care for the children, as well as ensuring that they are treated with understanding and respect and receive emotional support. Therefore, Wirral Council will continue to work with its Partner Agencies and the Voluntary and Faith Sectors to find ways to encourage peer support and access to Support Groups. There are currently Support Groups for Grandparents, Special Guardians and Foster Carers.


9. Complaints

Where a Family or Friends Carer is not satisfied with the level of support provided to enable them to care for the child, then they have access to the Local Authority’s complaints process. Our aim would be to resolve any such dissatisfaction without the need for a formal investigation but where an informal resolution is not possible, then a formal investigation will be arranged. The timescales and process are set out in the Wirral Council Complaints Procedure.


Annex A: Caring for Somebody Else's Child - Options

Click here to view Annex A: Caring for Somebody Else's Child - Options.

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